Here’s how to fool gamers, take their money that is.

It goes a bit like this: make a video game and market it as a standalone, complete game but sell it in parts.

Have the consumer pre-order the game to receive in-game gadgets, like two extra skins for the playable character or its weapons (but add nothing that change gameplay or the overall experience).

Go ahead, charge full price for a three-quarters of a game at best. It’s alright, just release the rest as DLCs.

If the game focuses on multiplayer mode, e.g. lots of first person shooters, then hold on to half of the maps and ration them out in four DLCs during the game’s lifecycle, together with some uncanny weapons that didn’t make it past alpha phase.

And if the game is story driven, then release two or three DLCs with a few hours worth of side-quest gameplay. You should have made these already at launch, but withhold from the original release.

Anyhow, the total sum of these DLCs can almost reach the price point of the game itself. Yeah, you’re getting double paid. If you want money in the bank, then sell a season pass so that players can gain access to all content to something you should call, “a great price”. And to appeal to these fanboys, promise that they will get it a week earlier than the suckers buying the DLCs piece by piece.

Then – if the game proves to be any successful after a year – release a Game of the Year edition. Include everything above and be nice, and run a time-limited promotional pricing campaign for a short while before charing full price again.

After that you can always make a remake of the game, on whatever future current generation of gaming platform is; be sure to save your high resolution textures for this. Or you may just re-release the game and add “10th Anniversary Edition”.

That’s how to earning money on video games. I’m sure there are plenty of other ways, but these are the most obvious and common.

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